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Changes to the Delivery of SIA Licence Linked Qualifications

The SIA have recently announced details of new content that must be delivered as part of the licence-linked qualifications.

The new content must be implemented by the end of October and relates to the following subjects:

a.    identifying vulnerable people
b.    describe action that can be taken to protect vulnerable people
c.    identifying the behaviour of sexual predators
d.    identifying indicators of child sexual exploitation.

Please note that there is no change to the minimum contact hours. IQ will be updating our qualification specifications and other relevant documents shortly to reflect these changes. The full SIA instructions can be found below or alternatively you can download a PDF version here.

Instructions to training providers on the delivery of SIA licence-linked qualifications.

Please read this document very carefully as it contains important information regarding the content of training that you must deliver for licenced-linked qualifications.
1. The qualifications required for a SIA licence contribute to ensuring the safety of security operatives and the public.  They do this because they contain important content on safety issues that individuals applying for a licence have to learn.

2. The work of training providers is crucial in making sure that security operatives have the knowledge and skills that are needed to keep themselves and the public safe.

3. This document contains instructions on training that you must deliver as part of the licence-linked qualifications.  We have given you advice on what content must be included.

4. This content relates to some areas that you already deliver.  The purpose of this additional content is to raise awareness of some more ways in which security operatives can help safeguard the public.  There are four basic areas that are covered;

a.    identifying vulnerable people
b.    describe action that can be taken to protect vulnerable people
c.    identifying the behaviour of sexual predators
d.    identifying indicators of child sexual exploitation.

5. We are requiring you to cover these areas in the training because there is clear evidence of the risk posed to the public and we, the Home Office and the Police as well as agencies like the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre feel that security operatives can help to keep people safe.  We have detailed where this extra training should be included within this document.

6. You should be delivering this extra content from the end of October 2013.  Some of this content can be delivered as part of the non-contact time, although the content relating to ejections and refusal of entry of vulnerable people will need to be delivered as part of the contact time for the conflict management unit. This training does not mean a change to the minimum contact hours.  Your awarding body will want evidence that this training is being delivered.

7. I want to thank you for your help in this.  I know you will want to help in this important work and I suggest that we should all be proud of the fact that so many agencies recognise the value of the training you deliver.

Additional Training for the Level 2 Award in Door Supervision.


1. This document details additional training that you must deliver against the learning outcomes in the Level 2 Award for Door Supervisors.

2. Each of the areas of training that you must include show which area of the existing ‘Specification for Learning and Qualification’ to which they relate.

Definition of a vulnerable person.

Why you need to deliver this training.

Door Supervisors already make a major contribution to the safety of customers in pubs, bars and clubs.  We want to make sure that Door Supervisors recognise customers that may be vulnerable.  This will help Door Supervisors deal with incidents in a way that will ensure the safety of customers.

There have been occasions where vulnerable customers have been victims of crime in the night time economy.  This training will help reduce the risk of this happening in future.

Where does this training relate to the current syllabus?

This training relates to Section 8 of the ‘Specification for Learning and Qualifications for Door Supervisors’.  It specifically relates to the outcome ‘Demonstrate an understanding of how to remain alert and vigilant of unusual and suspicious activity’.
It is covered by Assessment Criterion 8.3 of the qualification unit - Identify indicators of unusual and suspicious activity

What you must deliver.

The following content has been adapted from learning materials produced by Northumbria Police.  You should use and adapt them so that you are able to deliver training to allow Door Supervisors to recognise a vulnerable person.

Additional Training –

Identify factors that make a person vulnerable.

The following factors can lead to a person being vulnerable;

1. Being under the influence of Alcohol or Drugs:
People under the influence of alcohol or drugs can be vulnerable because they can have;

  • reduced inhibitions
  • decreased ability to make considered decisions
  • changed perceptions of their own abilities and limitations
  • become overly gregarious
  • display aggression
  • lack of spatial awareness increasing the likelihood of them hurting themselves or others.


2. Individuals that are alone or are receiving unwanted attention.

  • Individuals that become separated from their friends or appear lost or isolated can be vulnerable.
  • An individual receiving unwanted attention over a period of time or is being followed or threatened can also be vulnerable.


3. Potential victims of domestic violence.

  • Victims of domestic violence can be at an increased risk of assault and harm, which may be fuelled by alcohol.


4. Young people

  • Whilst anyone can be vulnerable, this is especially true of people under the age of 18.


5. Presence of a sexual predator.

  • A person will be more vulnerable if they are the target of a sexual predator (recognising the behaviour of a sexual predator is covered below).



Identify the behaviour of sexual predators

Why you need to deliver this training.

Vulnerable people can be at risk from sexual predators.  This training will allow Door Supervisors to recognise the behaviour of sexual predators and allow them to protect vulnerable people and stop crimes being committed.

Where does this training relate to the current syllabus?

This training relates to Section 8 of the ‘Specification for Learning and Qualifications for Door Supervisors’.  It specifically relates to the outcome ‘Demonstrate an understanding of how to remain alert and vigilant of unusual and suspicious activity’.

It is covered by Assessment Criterion 8.3 of the qualification unit - Identify indicators of unusual and suspicious activity

What you must deliver.

The following content has been adapted from learning materials produced by Northumbria Police.  You should use and adapt them so that you are able to deliver training to allow Door Supervisors to recognise the behaviour of a sexual predator.

Additional Training - Identify the behaviours of potential sexual predators.

1. What is a sexual predator?
A sexual predator is a person who commits sexual crimes. Sexual predators are often friendly and self-assured and can be any race, profession, level of intelligence or age. A person can be a predator if they are ignorant to the fact that a person cannot consent to sex if they are drunk.

2. How does a sexual predator pick victims?
Sexual predators may select or target victims based on

  • vulnerability
  • availability
  • gender
  • location
  • race
  • appearance.


3. How to spot sexual predators and what action you can take.

  • A sexual predator may be a lone male.  If you see a woman being pestered, there are options you have.  This might include approach the woman being pestered to assess her safety, informing the venue management or calling the police.
  • Sexual predators can use drugs such has Rohypnol to facilitate their crimes.  If you find drugs that you think might be Rohypnol or a similar drug that you feel may be used to facilitate a crime then call the police.
  • If you see a heavily intoxicated female and male exiting the premises consider intervening to seek clarity of the relationship to ensure the safety of the female.
  • If there is a regular lone attendee at your venue you probably know who these individuals are. Do they leave with different women every time they come? Do the women appear intoxicated? If so then this may an indication of a sexual predator.


Understanding the risks to vulnerable people being ejected from, or refused entry to, a venue.

Why you need to deliver this training.

Often people can be vulnerable if they are ejected from a pub or club or refused entry.  They can be separated from friends and find themselves alone and vulnerable.

Where does this training relate to the current syllabus?

This training relates to the ‘Specification for Learning and Qualifications in Conflict Management.  Specifically, it relates to Session 4b: Application of Communication Skills and Conflict Management for Door Supervisors.  The content should be delivered under sections 1 Refusing Entry to a Customer and 2 Ejecting a customer from the venue.

What you must deliver.

The following content has been adapted from learning materials produced by Northumbria Police.  You should use and adapt them so that you are able to deliver training to allow Door Supervisors to ensure the safety of vulnerable people who have been ejected or refused entry to a venue.

Additional Training - State factors to consider when ejecting or refusing entry to a person that may be vulnerable.

1. When a Door Supervisor ejects an individual or refuses them entry to a venue, he or she should consider whether this leaves the individual vulnerable.  If so, then the Door Supervisor should consider if there are ways that the welfare of the individual could be protected.

2. When refusing entry or ejecting someone that may be vulnerable from a venue, the following should be considered;

  • Is the person under the age of 18 and in need of particular help (see Considerations for Dealing with 14-18 year olds under incident scenarios)
  • Is the individual vulnerable due to being under the influence of drink or drugs?
  • Is the individual alone or do they have friends nearby?
  • Do they have their belongings?
  • Do they need medical attention?


3. If the professional judgement of the Door Supervisor is that the individual may be vulnerable, then he or she should consider what help can be provided.  There are a number of options that a Door Supervisor can consider, which include;

  • Seeking the help of Street Pastors, Street Marshalls or any other scheme active in the area to help people in the night time economy
  • Particularly in the case of younger people, is there a relative you can call to assist the vulnerable person
  • Calling for a taxi to take the vulnerable person home
  • Using ‘safe havens’ or other local initiatives run by organisations such as St Johns Ambulance
  • Call the police.

Additional Training for;

  • Level 2 Award in Door Supervision
  • Level 2 Award in Security Guarding
  • Level 2 Award in CCTV Operations (Public Space Surveillance)


Identify and know how to report indicators of child sexual exploitation.

Why you need to deliver this training.

Security operatives can play an important role in safeguarding members of the public.  You already deliver training on spotting suspicious behaviours.  This training will add to what you already deliver so that security operatives will be better able to spot signs of child sexual exploitation and know how to report any suspicions they have.

Where does this training relate to the current syllabus?

This training relates to the following Units of the licence-linked qualifications;

  • Working as a Door Supervisor.  Assessment Criterion 8.3 Identify indicators of unusual and suspicious activity
  • Working as a security Guard.  Assessment Criterion 2.5 Explain the importance of vigilance and using local and site knowledge when patrolling
  • Practical Operation of CCTV Unit.  Assessment Criterion 2.3 Identify body language and behaviours that could indicate unusual or suspicious activity



What you must deliver.

The following content has been adapted from materials produced by the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre.  You should use and adapt it so that you are able to deliver training to allow security operatives to recognise signs of child sexual exploitation, and understand who to contact with any concerns that they have.  If you want further resources, these can be obtained from the website of the National Working Group for Sexually Exploited Children and Young People onwww.nationalworkinggroup.org.

Additional Training - Identify and know how to report indicators of Child Sexual Exploitation

1. There have been a number of high profile cases that have highlighted crimes connected with the sexual exploitation of children.  Security staff often work at night and may work where some of the crimes associated with child sexual exploitation happen.  This training will help security staff to recognise some of the warning signs that these type of crimes may be taking place.  It will also help identify how to report concerns that security staff might have.

2. There are a number of warning signs that crimes associated with child sexual exploitation may be taking place.  These include;

  • Children and young people in the company of older people or anti-social groups
  • Young people acting in an inappropriate and sexualised way with adults or older people
  • Children and young people intoxicated, particularly if they are with older men who are not intoxicated.


3. Visible signs that children are being trafficked might mean child sexual exploitation is taking place.  Warning signs of this include

  • Children and young people arriving and departing a location with different adults on the same day or over a period of time
  • Children and young people getting into and out of a number of different cars
  • Groups of young people using hotels or bed and breakfast establishments with older men.


4. Children who are being sexually exploited may show changes in behaviour or start to look different.  This includes;

  • Unexplained changes in behaviour, such as chaotic, aggressive or sexual behaviour
  • Self-harming or suicide attempts
  • Showing fear in certain company
  • Having cuts and bruises from assaults
  • Having unaffordable new items like clothes or phones
  • Developing expensive new habits like alcohol or drug use.


5. Security staff who suspect that child sexual exploitation is taking place should contact the Police. If they want to remain anonymous, then they can call Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.


Sep 18, 2013 09:48 AM
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